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Moody DeWitt Wharam, Jr.

Portrait of Moody DeWitt Wharam, Jr.
Moody DeWitt Wharam, Jr.
Artist:
Date: 2005
Medium: Oil on canvas
Dimensions: 41.5 x 33.5 in.
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Moody Dewitt Wharam , Jr.

1941-

Wharam, a professor of radiation oncology and molecular radiology sciences at Johns Hopkins, was born in Washington, D.C. He earned his bachelor’s degree in economics from Harvard University in 1963, then served as an ensign in the U.S. Navy Reserve from 1963 to 1965. Wharam earned his medical degree from the University of Virginia in 1969, then completed a traineeship in pediatric cardiology at Brompton Hospital for Diseases of the Chest in London and an internship in medicine and pediatrics at Georgetown University Medical Center in Washington, D.C.

From 1970 to 1973, Wharam held a National Institutes of Health fellowship in radiation therapy at the University of California Medical Center in San Francisco. He then completed a fellowship at the University of California, Davis.

In 1975, Wharam came to Johns Hopkins as one of the early radiation oncologists. He initially treated all types of cancer, but as the radiation oncology clinic expanded and more staff were recruited, he made pediatric cancers his primary focus. In 1990, he was named acting director of the division of radiation oncology and in 1994, was named director of the division.

From 1980 to 1990, he also served as director of the radiation oncology committee of the Pediatric Oncology Group, a U.S. and Canadian collaborative group that studied childhood cancers. His role in this premier group made him an active participant in all of the pivotal pediatric cancer research of the time—work that led to dramatic increases in pediatric cancer survival rates.

He is a member of the International Society of Pediatric Oncology, the Children’s Oncology Group and the American Society of Radiation Oncology.

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