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Mark Charles Rogers

Portrait of Mark Rogers
Mark Charles Rogers
Artist:
Date: 2015
Medium: Oil on canvas
Dimensions: 31 x 40 in.
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Mark Charles Rogers

1942-

Rogers, a chief of anesthesiology at Johns Hopkins, was born in New York City. He earned his bachelor’s degree from Columbia University in 1964 and his M.D. from Upstate Medical Center, part of the State University of New York, in 1969.

After completing an internship in pediatrics at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, Rogers was a pediatric resident at Children’s Hospital Medical Center of Boston, a fellow in pediatric cardiology at Duke University Medical Center, an anesthesia resident at Massachusetts General Hospital, and clinical fellow in anesthesia and pediatrics at Harvard Medical School. From 1975 to 1977, Rogers was a major in the United States Army Medical Corps and director of the newborn service at Ireland Army Hospital in Fort Knox, Kentucky. He was also a clinical associate professor of pediatrics and anesthesia at the University of Louisville Medical School in Kentucky.

In 1977, Rogers came to Johns Hopkins to become founding director of the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit and assistant professor of anesthesia and pediatrics. In 1980, he was named anesthesiologist-in-chief. Leading the Department of Anesthesiology/Critical Care Medicine for the next twelve years, Rogers propelled both the department and the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit to the forefront of medicine in the United States. He changed the focus from anesthetic drug research to the physiology of critically ill patients, recruited Richard Traystman to head research efforts, and appointed Robert Donham as clinical director. Rogers pioneered programs for cross-training students in neurology, pediatrics, and internal medicine; these individuals also participated in fellowship programs in pediatric, neurologic, and surgical intensive care. His textbooks in pediatric intensive care in anesthesiology are used throughout the world.

Rogers left Johns Hopkins in 1991 to serve as vice chancellor for health affairs at Duke University Medical Center and as executive director and chief executive officer at Duke Hospital and Health Network. He then became a senior executive of the firm that sequenced the human genome, head of a major biotech investment bank, and a founder of multiple public biopharmaceutical companies. Rogers is a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences. He remains active in public service and has advised Congress on ways to facilitate advances in health care.

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