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Gary William Goldstein

Gary William Goldstein
Artist:
Date: 2018
Medium: Oil on canvas
Dimensions: 30 x 24 inches
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Gary William Goldstein

1942-

Goldstein, a president and chief executive officer of the Kennedy Krieger Institute, was born in Milwaukee. He received his B.A. in 1963 and his M.D. in 1966, both from the University of Chicago. Goldstein completed a residency in pediatrics at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis in 1968, a residency in neurology at Stanford Medical Center in Palo Alto in 1969, and a residency in neurology at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in 1970. Goldstein then served as a major in the United States Army for two years at Fitzsimons General Hospital in Denver before completing a postdoctoral fellowship in neurology at the University of California, San Francisco in 1973.

Goldstein joined the faculty of the University of California, San Francisco in 1973 and achieved the rank of associate professor of neurology before moving to the University of Michigan in 1979 as the director of pediatric neurology. He was promoted to full professor there in 1980, and in 1984, was named Research Scientist in the Center for Human Growth and Development. Goldstein was appointed president and chief executive officer of the Kennedy Krieger Institute in 1988, and also joined the faculty of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine as a professor of neurology and pediatrics. In 1994, he was appointed professor of environmental health sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health.

During his tenure as president, the Kennedy Krieger Institute expanded its physical campus with the addition of new buildings, expanded its fundraising efforts, and partnered with the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health on the Wendy Klag Center for Autism and Developmental Disabilities which opened in 2013.

Goldstein’s research activities focused on the role of brain capillaries in the formation of the blood brain barrier and the mechanisms of capillary injury in toxic brain disorders. He has received grants in this area from the National Institutes of Health, the National Foundation-March of Dimes, and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences.

Goldstein has written over 100 articles and book chapters over the course of his professional career. He served on the editorial boards for Annals of Neurology, Child Neurology Annals of Neurology, Neurobase, and Advances in Neurology.

Goldstein holds memberships in the American Academy of Neurology, the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Neurological Association, the Child Neurology Society, and the Society for Neuroscience. He held the position of president from 1988 to 1990 in Professors of Child Neurology, and from 1992 to 1993 in the American Association of University Affiliated Programs. He was awarded the Interns’ Award for Outstanding Teaching in 1971 from the Fitzsimons General Hospital, the Basil O’Connor Starter Research Award from the National Foundation-March of Dimes in 1975, the Research Career Development Awards from the National Institutes of Health in 1977, and the United Cerebral Palsy Research and Educational Foundation Weinstein Goldenson Medical Science Award in 1995.

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