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Georgeanna Seegar Jones and Howard W. Jones, Jr.

Portrait of Georgeanna Seegar Jones & Howard W. Jones, Jr.
Georgeanna Seegar Jones and Howard W. Jones, Jr.
Artist:
Date: 1977
Medium: Oil on canvas
Dimensions: 45 x 37.5 in.
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Georgeanna Seegar Jones

1912-2005

Jones, a pioneer in reproductive endocrinology at Johns Hopkins, was born in Baltimore. She received her B.A. in chemistry from Goucher College in 1932 and her M.D. from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 1936. After graduation, Jones served as a house officer in gynecology, 1936 to 1937; National Cancer Institute Trainee at The Johns Hopkins Hospital, 1937 to 1938; and trained in laboratory research in endocrinology in the department of surgery at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 1938 to 1939.

Jones was appointed a gynecologist and director of the laboratory of reproductive physiology and gynecologist-in-charge of the Gynecological Endocrine Clinic at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in 1939. Jones and her husband, Howard Jones, Jr. joined the part-time faculty in 1948, and maintained private practices as well. She was promoted to associate professor in 1957 and joined the full-time faculty in 1960.

Jones retired from Johns Hopkins in 1978 and was appointed professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Eastern Virginia Medical School, where along with her husband, they established the first in vitro fertilization (IVF) program in the United States and successfully induced the nation’s first in vitro fertilization baby, Elizabeth Comeau, in 1981. Both Jones and her husband became international spokespeople for the new field of reproductive medicine and were the only American gynecologists to advise the pope on IVF.

Along with her husband, she served as co-editor-in-chief for the Gynecological & Obstetrical Survey.  Jones was a member of several professional societies including the Baltimore City Medical Society, the Medical & Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland, the American Medical Society and the Southern Medical Society. In 1970, she was elected the first female president of the American fertility society. Jones wrote over ninety articles and book chapters during her career. In 1970, Goucher College awarded her an honorary Doctor of Science degree. Both Jones and her husband were honored by Hopkins in 2011 with a plaque and the dedication of the Howard W. Jones, Jr. and Georgeanna Seegar Jones lectureship.     

Howard W. Jones, Jr.

1910-2015

Jones, a pioneer in reproductive endocrinology at Johns Hopkins, was born in Baltimore. He received his A.B from Amherst College in 1931 and his M.D. from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 1935. Following his graduation from Johns Hopkins, Howard Jones completed his internship and residency in general surgery while working for both Howard Kelly and Kelly's successor as head of Johns Hopkins gynecology, Thomas S. Cullen.

During World War II, he joined the Army with the rank of major and served as a general battlefield surgeon with General George S. Patton Jr.'s Third Army as it fought its way across France and Germany. Returning to Johns Hopkins following the war, Howard Jones spent six months as a resident in gynecology. He joined the Johns Hopkins part-time faculty in 1948, maintaining private practices while working at the hospital, and became full-time faculty in 1960. Jones was also a visiting gynecologist at Church Home and Hospital, Union Memorial Hospital, Bon Secour Hospital, and St. Agnes Hospital.

Jones established the cryogenetics laboratory at Johns Hopkins when the field was in its infancy and pioneered gynecologic surgery, particularly in operating on babies born with ambiguous genitalia. In 1965, he helped found the Johns Hopkins Gender Identity Clinic, the first sex-change clinic in an American hospital. He also began work with in vitro fertilization in 1965, when he helped arrange for British scientist Robert Edwards to come to Johns Hopkins as a fellow to conduct experiments aimed at achieving the first fertilization of a human egg outside of the body in a petri dish, something he already had accomplished with mice. Working together and with others, Jones and Edwards succeeded but did not realize it at the time.

Jones retired from Johns Hopkins in 1978 and was appointed professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Eastern Virginia Medical School, where along with his wife, they established the first in vitro fertilization (IVF) program in the United States. They successfully induced the nation’s first in vitro fertilization baby, Elizabeth Comeau, in 1981. Jones called her every year on her birthday until his death. Both Jones and his wife became international spokespeople for the new field of reproductive medicine and were the only American gynecologists to advise the pope on IVF.

Jones wrote over 100 articles over the course of his career and his last publication was the book, In Vitro Fertilization Comes to America:  Memoir of a Medical Breakthrough, published just one year before his death. Both Jones and his wife were honored by Hopkins in 2011 with a plaque and the dedication of the Howard W. Jones, Jr. and Georgeanna Seegar Jones lectureship.     

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